Agenda 21 On the March in Los Angeles County

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042712-no-agenda-21-smThe idea behind Agen­da 21 is to force cit­i­zens to live, work and play where gov­ern­ment wants not where the peo­ple want.  Gov­ern­ment, under the Agen­da 21 pro­gram is mov­ing toward giv­ing incen­tives to build apart­ments and com­mer­cial prop­er­ties near gov­ern­ment trans­porta­tion sys­tems.  On the oth­er hand gov­ern­ment is cre­at­ing dis­in­cen­tives for those want­i­ng to live in sin­gle fam­i­ly homes and lives where they want, away from the cen­ter of a city.  And, this is being done by the crony cap­i­tal­ist of the Los Ange­les Busi­ness Coun­cil as the voice of Agen­da 21, the front group for gov­ern­ment and spe­cial inter­ests.

The utopi­an con­cept of “co-loca­tion” – plac­ing jobs near hous­ing has been elu­sive in Los Ange­les, says the study’s author, Dr. Paul Habibi, Pro­fes­sor of Real Estate at the UCLA Ander­son School of Man­age­ment and Ziman Cen­ter for Real Estate.  Land is so cost­ly through­out LA, says Habibi, that he sees more hope in link­ing “hous­ing cen­ters” and “job cen­ters” through mass tran­sit, rather than try­ing to keep them close togeth­er.

My solu­tion is real­ly look­ing at the sup­ply side of the equa­tion and try­ing to max­i­mize the devel­opable land area where devel­op­ers can now place new work­force and afford­able hous­ing units in prox­im­i­ty to tran­sit cen­ters that peo­ple can uti­lize to get to work,” Habibi says.

Business Summit: Linking jobs, homes and transit is key to LA’s future

by Bri­an Watt, KPCC,  10/18/13

The Los Ange­les Busi­ness Coun­cil has just released a new report propos­ing solu­tions to the region’s tran­sit, jobs and afford­able hous­ing chal­lenges.

 

A home, a job, and an easy ride between the two. Los Ange­les Coun­ty has strug­gled to pro­vide those essen­tials — with hous­ing costs ris­ing so high in the areas where jobs are locat­ed that many work­ers have no choice but to live far away and suf­fer a long com­mute.

The Los Ange­les Busi­ness Coun­cil con­vened a sum­mit at UCLA and released a com­pre­hen­sive report on Fri­day with the aim of address­ing those chal­lenges. The report sug­gests that the expand­ing tran­sit cor­ri­dors in the coun­ty may offer the best hope to devel­op new hous­ing for work­ers. It even cre­ates a “Liv­able Com­mu­ni­ty Oppor­tu­ni­ty Index”  high­light­ing areas near tran­sit sta­tions with the best poten­tial to devel­op hous­ing  that mid­dle-income earn­ers could afford.

The index clas­si­fies tran­sit sta­tion areas as “hot, warm, or cool” mar­kets for devel­op­ing liv­able com­mu­ni­ties. The Pico sta­tion on the Metro Blue Line and the Long Beach Tran­sit Mall top the index, but the report also points to the Van Nuys Orange Line Sta­tion and land near the Florence/La Brea sta­tion on the future Cren­shaw Line as prime oppor­tu­ni­ties for devel­op­ment.

LA Coun­ty Sta­tion Areas with Liv­able Com­mu­ni­ty Oppor­tu­ni­ty Index Rat­ing

The utopi­an con­cept of “co-loca­tion” – plac­ing jobs near hous­ing – has been elu­sive in Los Ange­les, says the study’s author, Dr. Paul Habibi, Pro­fes­sor of Real Estate at the UCLA Ander­son School of Man­age­ment and Ziman Cen­ter for Real Estate. Land is so cost­ly through­out LA, says Habibi, that he sees more hope in link­ing “hous­ing cen­ters” and “job cen­ters” through mass tran­sit, rather than try­ing to keep them close togeth­er.

My solu­tion is real­ly look­ing at the sup­ply side of the equa­tion and try­ing to max­i­mize the devel­opable land area where devel­op­ers can now place new work­force and afford­able hous­ing units in prox­im­i­ty to tran­sit cen­ters that peo­ple can uti­lize to get to work,” Habibi says.

LABC coverCon­tin­ue arti­cle here:  http://capoliticalnews.com/2013/10/18/agenda-21-on-the-march-in-los-angeles-county/

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